Purinethol

Purinethol 60 tabs x 50mg
Substance

Indications:

Purinethol (mercaptopurine) is indicated for maintenance therapy of acute lymphatic (lymphocytic, lymphoblastic) leukemia as part of a combination regimen. The response to this agent depends upon the particular subclassification of acute lymphatic leukemia and the age of the patient (pediatric or adult).

Purinethol is not effective for prophylaxis or treatment of central nervous system leukemia.

Purinethol is not effective in acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, the lymphomas (including Hodgkins Disease), or solid tumors.

Contra - indications:

Purinethol should not be used in patients whose disease has demonstrated prior resistance to this drug. In animals and humans, there is usually complete cross-resistance between mercaptopurine and thioguanine.

Purinethol should not be used in patients who have a hypersensitivity to mercaptopurine or any component of the formulation.

Administration:

Once a complete hematologic remission is obtained, maintenance therapy is considered essential. Maintenance doses will vary from patient o patient. The usual daily maintenance dose of PURINETHOL is 1.5 to 2.5 mg/kg/day as a single dose. It is to be emphasized that in pediatric patients with acute lymphatic leukemia in remission, superior results have been obtained when PURINETHOL has been combined with other agents (most frequently with methotrexate) for remission maintenance. PURINETHOL should rarely be relied upon as a single agent for the maintenance of remissions induced in acute leukemia.

Medical action:

Mercaptopurine (6-MP) competes with hypoxanthine and guanine for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) and is itself converted to thioinosinic acid (TIMP). This intracellular nucleotide inhibits several reactions involving inosinic acid (IMP), including the conversion of IMP to xanthylic acid (XMP) and the conversion of IMP to adenylic acid (AMP) via adenylosuccinate (SAMP). In addition, 6-methylthioinosinate (TIMP) is formed by the methylation of TIMP. Both TIMP and TIMP have been reported to inhibit glutamine-5-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase, the first enzyme unique to the de novo pathway for purine ribonucleotide synthesis. Experiments indicate that radiolabeled mercaptopurine may be recovered from the DNA in the form of deoxythioguanosine. Some mercaptopurine is converted to nucleotide derivatives of 6-thioguanine (6-TG) by the sequential actions of inosinate (IMP) dehydrogenase and xanthylate (XMP) aminase, converting TIMP to thioguanylic acid (TGMP).

Animal tumors that are resistant to mercaptopurine often have lost the ability to convert mercaptopurine to TIMP. However, it is clear that resistance to mercaptopurine may be acquired by other means as well, particularly in human leukemias.

It is not known exactly which of any one or more of the biochemical effects of mercaptopurine and its metabolites are directly or predominantly responsible for cell death.

Precautions:

Patients should be informed that the major toxicities of Purinethol are related to myelosuppression, hepatotoxicity, and gastrointestinal toxicity. Patients should never be allowed to take the drug without medical supervision and should be advised to consult their physician if they experience fever, sore throat, jaundice, nausea, vomiting, signs of local infection, bleeding from any site, or symptoms suggestive of anemia. Women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant.

Side effects:

If any of the following side effects occur while taking mercaptopurine, check with your doctor immediately

  • Abdominal or stomach pain or tenderness

  • black, tarry stools

  • blood in the urine or stools

  • clay colored stools

  • A cough or hoarseness

  • dark urine

  • decreased appetite

  • fever or chills

  • headache

  • itching

  • loss of appetite

  • lower back or side pain

  • nausea and vomiting

  • painful or difficult urination

  • pinpoint red spots on the skin

  • skin rash

  • swelling of the feet or lower legs

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusual tiredness or weakness

  • yellow eyes or skin

Less common

  • Bleeding gums

  • chest pain

  • joint pain

  • pale skin

  • shortness of breath

  • sore throat

  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth

  • swollen glands

  • troubled breathing with exertion

Overdosage:

Signs and symptoms of overdosage may be immediate (anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea); or delayed (myelosuppression, liver dysfunction, and gastroenteritis). Dialysis cannot be expected to clear mercaptopurine. Hemodialysis is thought to be of marginal use due to the rapid intracellular incorporation of mercaptopurine into active metabolites with long persistence. The oral LD50 of mercaptopurine was determined to be 480 mg/kg in the mouse and 425 mg/kg in the rat. There is no known pharmacologic antagonist of mercaptopurine. The drug should be discontinued immediately if unintended toxicity occurs during treatment. If a patient is seen immediately following an accidental overdosage of the drug, it may be useful to induce emesis.